WILD GAME PROCESSING

With commercial quality equipment your meat will be vacuum sealed and labeled before being stored in our industrial sized walk-in freezer.

Oak Stone Wild Game Processing

(Wild Game Processing the Wiebe Way)

Oak Stone Wild Game Processing is based out of Bradley, CA, about 25-minutes North of Paso Robles. Average cost of processing wild game is $180/per carcass with additional charges for sausage and burger. Our commercial-grade equipment ensures that your meat will stay fresh through vacuum seal packaging and storage within our industrial sized walk-in freezer. We also offer handmade sausage links in country breakfast, jalapeno/cheddar, Italian, as well as Swiss flavors, available in standard cuts and burger as well. In addition to professional cuts and delicious sausage, Oak Stone Wild Game Processing provides delivery services throughout the United States.

Oak Stone Butchers

Immense experience and knowledge in professional hunting practices covering a large span of California’s Central Coast has led our butchers to become expert in processing wild game, both big and small. The local big game hunts that we specialize in preparing are Blacktail Deer, Wild Pig, and Tule Elk, while California Valley Quail, Rio Grande Turkey, and Pheasant comprise our smaller cuts that are similarly as appetizing. All in all, Oak Stone Wild Game Processing allows you to enjoy the hunt even when you are back home and seated at the dinner table.

Standard Cuts:

Chops (Bone in/or Boneless)
Leg Roast Round Steaks (Bone in/or Boneless)
Shoulder (Roast and/or Chops)
Ribs
Burger

Pig, deer & Elk Cut and Packaged to your liking

$2 Per lb. (Charged on Hanging weight of the cleaned carcass) Includes: Cutting and Packaging of Traditional Cuts as well as Ground Burger or Fresh Ground Pork.

Sausage – $4 Per lb. (Linked and Packaged)  Minimum 25lbs EACH

Sausage Flavors:
Country Breakfast
Italian
Jalapeno/Cheddar
Swiss

 

RECIPE OF THE DAY

Pan Roasted Pork with Chimichurri

Pan Roasted Pork Chops

  • 2 pork chops, 1-2” thick
  • 3 cloves of garlic, smashed
  • A few sprigs of rosemary and thyme
  • 3 tbsp butter
  • Pork fat, beef fat or canola oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste

1.) In a heavy bottomed skillet, on medium high heat,  heat up enough fat to cover the bottom of a pan. Salt and pepper both sides of pork chops. When fat is smoking, put chops in the pan and let sear on one side, about 2-3 minutes until brown.

2.) Remove chops and carefully pour out the hot fat. Place the chop back into the pan, seared side up and throw in the butter. Turn heat down to medium-low. Add garlic and herbs on top of the chops. The butter will foam up and start to brown a bit. Repeatedly, spoon butter over garlic, herbs and chops for another 3-5 minutes, being careful not to burn the butter. 3 minutes if chops are on the thinner side, and 5 minutes for thicker chops. Turn chops onto their fat cap and render till golden brown and crispy.

Note: If pork chops are bone in, the may have to be coked a bit longer than boneless. You can either keep butter basting on the stovetop at medium low heat or throw in a preheated 450* oven for desired doneness.

3.) Remove pork chops from pan along with herbs and garlic, spoon a bit of butter over and let rest.

Chimichurri

  • 1/4 onion or shallot, small diced
  • 1 clove grated garlic
  • 1/2 cup parsley, finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup cilantro, finely chopped
  • A few sprigs of oregano, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup red wine vinegar
  • 3 tbsp olive oil

1.) Ground black pepper and salt to taste

2.) Mix all ingredients in a bowl and season to taste with salt and black pepper.

3.) Spoon over pork chop and braised beans.

Pork Braised Beans

  • 1 pint of pinto beans, soaked overnight if you can (yellow eyed, marfax beans, Jacobs cattle beans work great)
  • 2 tbsp pork fat or oil
  • 1/2 yellow onion
  • 5 cloves garlic, smashed
  • Chilis (optional)
  • 2 spicy chilis, de-seeded (optional)
  • 1 pork shank (I used part of a jowl because that what I had)
  • 4 quarts water
  • 1 tbsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 3 tbsp – Salt to taste
  • 1 lime
  • Fresh cilantro
  • Avocado (optional)

1.) Soaking your beans overnight enables a shorter cook time and a creamy texture. They are less likely to break apart. You can also cook your beans directly from their hard state, it will just take more time.

2.) In a heavy bottomed pot, heat fat or oil. For 2 minutes, lightly sauté the garlic, onions, chilis (de-seeded) pork shank, cumin and coriander. Add the beans and 4 quarts of hot water. Bring everything up to a boil then reduce to a very low simmer. Depending on the type and size of the bean, they can take anywhere from 2-4 hours. Occasionally give them a stir and check their tenderness. When they are just about done, add the salt, juice of one lime and finish cooking until they are nice and creamy but are still intact.

3.) Serve with picked cilantro and avocado.